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HIWA was formed to give voice to the many people and groups who feel they and the injured workers they support are being abused and victimized by a growing political agenda that has lost concern and compassion for the real victims of industrial injury, the workers.

Welcome to Hawaii Injured Worker's Online
5 Tales of Harm

Injured workers share their stories, revealing the real-life impact of rollbacks that have been spreading across the country.

The Fallout of Workers’ Comp ‘Reforms’:
5 Tales of Harm

The celebration held on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017 at the Soka Gakkai International (SGI) Culture Center was a fantastic event. It was free and open to the public and it was a great opportunity to meet and network for Peace.

In 2007, Hawai`i Act 23, declared:

“September 21st of each year shall be known and recognized as “Peace Day” to promote peace programs, improve international relations, and increase educational awareness of peace.”

Celebration of the 10th Anniversary of Peace Day Hawai`i
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Manning the table
The Destruction of Work Comp

by Michael Grabell, ProPublica, and Howard Berkes, NPR
March 4, 2015

Over the past decade, states have slashed workers’ compensation benefits, denying injured workers help when they need it most and shifting the costs of workplace accidents to taxpayers.

The Demolition of Workers’ Comp
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Intro

 

Welcome to Hawaii Injured Worker's Association Online

 

Officially organized on November 4, 2004 as Hawaii Injured Workers Association when over 50 concerned citizens of the state met, drafted and approved a charter. The now Hawai'i Injured Workers Association (HIWA) was formed on the example of parallel organizations across the U.S. and Canada. Like its many sister organizations, HIWA was formed to give voice to the many people and groups who feel they and the injured workers they support are being abused and victimized by a growing political agenda that has lost concern and compassion for the real victims of industrial injury, the workers.

Business, corporations and insurers dominate and control testimony at the State Capitol these days. Balance is gone when injured workers are afraid to testify for fear of retaliation. (Hawaii law has no protection for workers who testify against their employers' positions.)

 

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The Hawai’i Injured Workers Association (HIWA) recently sponsored their annual special educational workshop, held Saturday, June 24th. As with all our educational events for Hawaii's injured workers we would like to see as many people show up as possible, so we'd like to thank everyone that made the time to attend. Hopefully, they went away better informed on how to cope with and navigate Hawaii's broken, confusing and many times unjust Work Comp system. We'd also like to thank all those that worked tirelessly, generously donating their time to make this workshop a success; from marketing, to the hours of preparations, mahalo for your devotion.

Thank you  to Alan Yonan Jr. for the great article in the Star-Advertiser's Sunday edition. The article is reprinted below.

(As relevant today as it was in 2014 when this artical was written)


Hula Dancer at Sunset Oahu HawaiiQuestion: What role does the Hawaii Injured Workers Association play in Hawaii's workers' compensation system?

Answer: The Hawaii Injured Workers Association (HIWA) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization concerned with the well-being of many injured, disabled and displaced workers in Hawaii who suffer financial and personal hardships due to work-related industrial injuries and occupational diseases.

HIWA's mission is to educate, organize and support injured workers. HIWA also educates the general public. HIWA promotes safe and healthy work environments.

HIWA meetings afford an opportunity for injured workers to network with one another and with professionals to help them navigate Hawaii's workers' compensation system.

depression work comp

The phrase “workplace injury” typically conjures a physical ailment—a back injury, a laceration, a respiratory illness—but there’s another, often overlooked consequence of on-the-job injuries that can affect both employees and a company’s bottom line: depression.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), depression “is one of the leading causes of disease or injury worldwide for both men and women,” with a resulting total economic burden in the United States of $210.5 billion in 2010. CDC’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey indicated that between 2009-2012, 7.6 percent of Americans over the age of 12 struggled with depression, and nearly 43 percent of those who suffered from severe depressive symptoms also experienced “serious difficulties in work, home and social activities.”

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IWP The Patient Advocate Pharmacy

Next HIWA Meeting

Hawaii Injured Workers Meetings 2017

Our Non-Profit Status

 

On 12/12/2012 HIWA was granted its non-profit status by the IRS, effective as of 11/30/2011

ER ID No. 45-4038392

 

Donate Today

 

HIWA is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization

Call: (808) 538-9771